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How to Extract Images, Audio and Video from Word and PowerPoint Files

A Word or PowerPoint document can contain embedded images, audio and video files. These files can be copied to the clipboard and pasted to another Word document or PowerPoint slide, but copy-paste cannot recover these files in the original format or resolution. If the document author had resized the image after importing them into the document, you will get only the scaled image and not the original one. Embedded audio and video cannot be copied and pasted to your hard drive, for instance. This guide will show you how to extract embedded files in Word documents and PowerPoint presentations in their original format.

Extract Objects from Word Documents

Method 1 (Applies to Word 2007 and 2010 Files DOCX)

  1. Change the file extension of the Word document from DOCX to ZIP. You can do this easily from the context menu using Change File Extension Shell Menu
  2. Open the ZIP file using any archive viewer like WinRAR or WinZip.
  3. The original image files in their full resolution will be found inside the folder /doc/media. Select the images you want and extract it from the archive file.

    docx-images

  4. Embedded MP3 files will be inside the folder /doc/embeddings. However, the extension of the MP3 files will be changed to BIN. Extract the BIN files and change their extension back to MP3.
  5. Rename the Word document from ZIP to DOCX once again.

Method 2 (Applies to all Word Files DOCX and DOC)

  1. Open the Word file and save the document as a Webpage.

    word-as-webpage

  2. This will create an HTM file and a folder containing all the embedded objects in the Word document. Inside this folder you will find all images and audio files. Once again, MP3 files will be renamed to BIN which you will have to change to MP3.

Unfortunately, you can only recover embedded MP3 files. If the embedded file is a WAV or OGG, this method doesn’t work.

Extract Objects from PowerPoint Slides

Method 1 (Applies to PowerPoint 2007 and 2010 Files PPSX and PPTX)

  1. Change the file extension of the PowerPoint slide from PPSX or PPTX to ZIP. You can do this easily from the context menu using Change File Extension Shell Menu
  2. Open the ZIP file using any archive viewer like WinRAR or 7-Zip.
  3. The original image files in their full resolution along with all embedded audio and video in the original format will be found inside the folder /ppt/media. Select the files you want and extract it from the archive file.

    ppt-zip

  4. Rename the PowerPoint file from ZIP to PPTX or PPSX once again.

Method 2 (Applies to all PowerPoint Files PPT, PPS, PPSX and PPTX)

  1. Open the PowerPoint file and save it as a Webpage.
  2. This will create an HTM file and a folder containing all the embedded objects in the PowerPoint slide. Inside this folder you will find all images, audio and video files in the original format.

Comments

  1. There is a difference between converting a PPT presentation into a video and extracting videos and images from a PPT presentation.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great info, but it did not work for some ASF files I am trying to get out of a Word document. Anytime I try copying it out, I get a scrambled video file.

    ReplyDelete
  3. a friend of mine recorded a class and sent me as a word file but i dont see anything embedded in it and your method above also did not work. any suggestions on how i might extract the audio from the word (2010)file?

    ReplyDelete
  4. omg, you rock. So what I've been looking for to be able to extract lots of images without doing save-as.

    Brilliant! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Awesome!! It worked (with a pptx) purfectly! Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you! Your instructions worked perfectly. I was able to extract the original video files (.wmv) that were embedded within a powerpoint presentation. I didn't have to go searching for the original videos.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Neat trick, but not functional when embedding mp4 files. The bin file is not encoded in a way that is readable with a simple file extension change will work on.

    ReplyDelete

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